Thursday, November 13, 2014

Article Number: 9939




Common Name: CALCIUM PHOSPHIDE





CAS Number: 1305-99-3



DOT Number: UN 1360



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Substance number: 0329



Date: 8/1/87 Revision:



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HAZARD SUMMARY



* Calcium Phosphide can affect you when breathed in.



* Phosphine gas is a highly toxic gas released when Calcium



Phosphide is wet or has contacted moisture. Consult the NJ DOH



Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet on Phosphine. * Calcium Phosphide



is a DANGEROUS FIRE and EXPLOSION HAZARD.







IDENTIFICATION



Calcium Phosphide is a reddish-brown crystalline (sugar or sand-



like) or a grey granular solid. It is used to kill rodents and



in explosives and fireworks.





REASON FOR CITATION



* Calcium Phosphide is on the Hazardous Substance List because it



is cited by DOT.







HOW TO DETERMINE IF YOU ARE BEING EXPOSED



* Exposure to hazardous substances should be routinely evaluated.



This may include collecting personal and area air samples. You



can obtain copies of sampling results from your employer. You



have a legal right to this information under OSHA 1910.20. * If



you think you are experiencing any work-related health problems,



see a doctor trained to recognize occupational diseases. Take



this Fact Sheet with you.







WORKPLACE EXPOSURE LIMITS



No occupational exposure limits have been established for Calcium



Phosphide. This does not mean that this substance is not



harmful. Safe work practices should always be followed.







WAYS OF REDUCING EXPOSURE



* Where possible, enclose operations and use local exhaust



ventilation at the site of chemical release. If local exhaust



ventilation or enclosure is not used, respirators should be worn.



* Wear protective work clothing.



* Dry brush or vacuum material thoroughly from skin immediately



after exposure to Calcium Phosphide and follow with large amounts



of water. * Post hazard and warning information in the work area.



In addition, as part of an ongoing education and training effort,



communicate all information on the health and safety hazards of



Calcium Phosphide to potentially exposed workers.







HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION





Acute Health Effects



The following acute (short-term) health effects may occur



immediately or shortly after exposure to Calcium Phosphide:





* Exposure to Calcium Phosphide that has contacted moisture can



expose you to Phosphine gas which is highly toxic and dangerous.



consult the NJ DOH Hazardous Substance Fact Sheet on phosphine.





Chronic Health Effects



The following chronic (long-term) health effects can occur at



some time after exposure to Calcium Phosphide and can last for



months or years:





Cancer Hazard



* According to the information presently available to the New



Jersey Department of Health, Calcium Phosphide has not been



tested for its ability to cause cancer in animals.





Reproductive Hazard



* According to the information presently available to the New



Jersey Department of Health, Calcium Phosphide has not been



tested for its ability to adversely affect reproduction.





Other Long-Term Effects



* No chronic (long-term) health effects are known at this time.







MEDICAL





Medical Testing



There is no special test for this chemical. However, if illness



occurs or overexposure is suspected, medical attention is



recommended.





Any evaluation should include a careful history of past and



present symptoms with an exam. Medical tests that look for



damage already done are not a substitute for controlling



exposure.





Request copies of your medical testing. You have a legal right



to this information under OSHA 1910.20.







WORKPLACE CONTROLS AND PRACTICES





Unless a less toxic chemical can be substituted for a hazardous



substance, ENGINEERING CONTROLS are the most effective way of



reducing exposure. The best protection is to enclose operations



and/or provide local exhaust ventilation at the site of chemical



release. Isolating operations can also reduce exposure. Using



respirators or protective equipment is less effective than the



controls mentioned above, but is sometimes necessary.





In evaluating the controls present in your workplace, consider:



(1) how hazardous the substance is, (2) how much of the substance



is released into the workplace and (3) whether harmful skin or



eye contact could occur. Special controls should be in place for



highly toxic chemicals or when significant skin, eye, or



breathing exposures are possible.





Good WORK PRACTICES can help to reduce hazardous exposures. The



following work practices are recommended:





* Workers whose clothing has been contaminated by Calcium



Phosphide should change into clean clothing promptly. *



Contaminated work clothes should be laundered by individuals who



have been informed of the hazards of exposure to Calcium



Phosphide. * On skin contact with Calcium Phosphide, immediately



wash or shower to remove the chemical. At the end of the



workshift, wash any areas of the body that may have contacted



Calcium Phosphide, whether or not known skin contact has



occurred. * Do not eat, smoke, or drink where Calcium Phosphide



is handled, processed, or stored, since the chemical can be



swallowed. Wash hands carefully before eating or smoking. * Use



a vacuum to reduce dust during clean-up. Do not dry sweep.





FIRE HAZARDS





* Calcium Phosphide releases highly flammable Phosphine gas on



contact with moisture. * DO NOT USE WATER OR FOAM EXTINGUISHERS.



* Use dry chemical, soda ash, or lime extinguishers.



* If employees are expected to fight fires, they must be trained



and equipped as stated in OSHA 1910.156.







SPILLS AND EMERGENCIES





If Calcium Phosphide is spilled, take the following steps:





* Restrict persons not wearing protective equipment from area of



spill until clean-up is complete. * Remove all ignition sources.



* Ventilate area of spill.



* Collect powdered material in the most convenient and safe



manner and deposit in sealed containers. * It may be necessary to



contain and dispose of Calcium Phosphide as a HAZARDOUS WASTE.



Contact your state Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)



or your regional office of the federal Environmental Protection



Agency (EPA) for specific recommendations.







HANDLING AND STORAGE





* Prior to working with Calcium Phosphide you should be trained



on its proper handling and storage. * Store in tightly closed



containers in a cool, well-ventilated area away from STRONG



OXIDIZERS (such as CHLORINE, BROMINE and FLUORINE), STRONG ACIDS



(such as HYDROCHLORIC, SULFURIC and NITRIC), OXYGEN, SULFUR or



MOISTURE since violent reactions occur. * Sources of ignition,



such as smoking and open flames, are prohibited where Calcium



Phosphide is handled, used, or stored. * Use only nonsparking



tools and equipment, especially when opening and closing



containers of Calcium Phosphide. * Wherever Calcium Phosphide is



used, handled, manufactured, or stored, use explosion-proof



electrical equipment and fittings. * Do not store large amounts



of this material in a room protected by WATER sprinkler systems.



* Protect containers against physical damage.







FIRST AID





Eye Contact



* Immediately flush with large amounts of water, after quickly



wiping excess Calcium Phosphide from face with dry cloth.



Continue without stopping for at least 30 minutes, occasionally



lifting upper and lower lids. Seek medical attention immediately.





Skin Contact



* Remove contaminated clothing. Remove Calcium Phosphide from



skin with a dry cloth. Wash with soap and water, rinsing with



large amounts of water.





Breathing



* Remove the person from exposure.



* Begin rescue breathing if breathing has stopped and CPR if



heart action has stopped. * Transfer promptly to a medical


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